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Uber Engage - involving drivers

This trial initiative provides people who drive for Uber with a formal voice in the business and gives them a platform for providing suggestions as to how the Uber app could be made better for both passengers and drivers.

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Symbolic benefits of washing-up liquid?

This is what the London advertising agency Grey has to say about the following advert for a washing up liquid:

Women make up nearly 50% of the UK workforce. Despite this, they also spend 117 more minutes every day on household chores than men. We don’t think that’s fair. And neither do Fairy. So, to coincide with International Women’s Day 2016, the iconic household brand asked one simple question: how fair is your home? Together, we made one small change to highlight the issue of gender equality and the division of roles in the home – removing the ‘y’ from the brand’s logo. Fairy became Fair. Check out the video below for more on the issue.

http://grey.com/london/work/key/fairy-fair/id/12590/

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Positioning a car

This is how the London advertising agency Grey describe the following advert:

Tasked with promoting Volvo's state-of-the-art CleanZone air filtration system, Grey London created probably the most tranquil, quiet car commercial you will ever see. The sensory film sees the viewer transported to the vast, un-spoilt, open Swedish landscape that inspired Volvo’s technology - 'as close to inhaling a lungful of Swedish Air as you can get without a plane ticket'. To draw attention at car shows and dealerships, the agency even created a luxury 'Swedish Air Inhaler' - a packaging concept for how 'Swedish Air' might be bottled as a consumable; a glass depiction of a deep breath of air.

http://grey.com/london/work/key/volvo-swedish-air/id/4737/

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Kids ask for light in 'best ever' anti-smoking ad - YouTube

Behaviour change is said to start with making people aware of the existence of a threat or a problem. This smoking cessation advert vividly shows that for many adults awareness of the harms caused by smoking already exists. The willingness to act on it does not. The ad claims that the adults threw away 

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Characteristics of communication media

This is a humorous look at the (positive) features of traditional communications media (catalogues) presented in the same way as we are used to seeing for more modern products.

On a more serious note it really does highlight why some firms still use catalogues in a world dominated by electronic devices.

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Managing a viral campaign

This video illustrates how a firm can engineer a viral campaign, but also how it can spin out of control and then has to be brought back to the firm's own direction.

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Apps and public relations

This is a UK social marketing campaign designed to reduce the public's consumption of sugar. As a social marketing campaign success cannot be measured in monetary terms, so it's worth seeing at the end of the clip how they measured success.

The campaign can be linked to a variety of basic and advanced behaviour change models.

 

 

 

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Grief and exchange

This clip has an interesting observation about the value of grief and its role in exchange. The relevant scene comes at 3.35 mins into the clip.

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SingTel Hawker Heroes Video Case - YouTube

This clip shows how public relations can be used to emotionally engage an audience and deliver specific marketing communication objectives for commercial organisations. You should note how thi campaign sought to change the attitudes of Singaporeans towards Singtel and the social marketing metrics that they used.

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Golden Circle 5th Anniversary | Shangri-La

The stand out feature of this advertisement is that the focus is very much on the tourist experience, outside the hotel. It shows what being a tourist means to one person, how they derive pleasure from it and why they are loyal to the brand.

The link to Shangri-La is almost imperceptible, but it is clear. The advert shows the type of person who stays at the Shangri-La and there is enough video coverage of the hotel interior to show people what the quality of the hotel itself is like.

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Shopping malls struggle to survive across India - BBC News

This is an interesting story about how shopping malls have been having a hard time in India. One of the reasons given by an industry commentator is that at the start of the mall development boom developers were too keen to sell units outright. No doubt they were attracted by the cashflow benefits and the chance to reduce the risk they faced in making a return on their investment. However this approach appears to have reduced the level of control they had over the tenants and as a result there have been problems for the management of the malls with owners not able to achieve the right mix of tenants or enforce policies on maintenance.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-33021116

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Bring your own device

One of the issues around consumer and industrial marketing is their convergence (Wind, 2006) and a development which illustrates this, is commonly referred to as, 'bring your own device':

Microsoft rose to dominance in an age when the CIO (chief information officer) really held the keys to IT decision making. Over the past five years, BYOD has really eroded the level of control that many CIOs have.”
— http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/mar/14/microsoft-office-ipad

The following video provides more information about this development and its implication for business buyers.

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Toyota's supply chain relationships

A document published by the Treasury of the New Zealand government provides insights into the real life differences between firms who develop relationships with members of their supply chain, in contrast to those who pursue more arms length exchanges. Here is an extract, followed by a video produced by Toyota which provides more detail.

Toyota, as many other Japanese firms, maintains a small stable set of ’highly trusted’ dedicated suppliers, restricts competition for the various orders only to them, caring for their profitability and rewarding the best performing suppliers with a higher share of orders, while replacing those that fail to deliver the extremely high levels of contractible and non-contractible quality required.
— http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2012/12-01/28.htm

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